All posts by David Martinez

Oscar Mendoza – The Opportunity Arrives!

By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

At our local Santa Barbara area boxing gym, Duke’s Boxing and Fitness, we have had many kids come in to learn boxing at its best.

In 2014 one of those kids, Oscar Mendoza walked in. At first he  just blended in with the others, but after a few months owner and former pro boxer Henry Calles and I noticed something special about Oscar. What stood out was his unbelievable dedication and work rate.

But, the thing that really got everybody was his willing to help others in the gym in a positive way to learn boxing. The amazing thing was that he was in the gym every day while working a full time job.

Continue reading Oscar Mendoza – The Opportunity Arrives!

Ancajas Retains Title Over Conlan by Knockout!

By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

On Saturday, November 18, 2017 IBF super flyweight champion Jerwin Ancajas (28-1-1 / 19 by KO) retained his title by knockout over previously unbeaten Jamie Conlan (19-1- 11 by KO) in round six.

Ancajas traveled from his native country the Philippines to Belfast, Northern Ireland the home town to Conlan, to make his third title defense.

It was a one-sided affair, in which I gave every round to the Filipino fighter.

Continue reading Ancajas Retains Title Over Conlan by Knockout!

Pages From The Scrapbook

By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Recently I brought a new category to my website, which is “Pages From The Scrapbook”.

A lot of my fan base don’t know that back in the seventies, eighties, and nineties that I was a boxing beat writer for my local newspaper the Santa Barbara News Press, doing fight predictions and  also a guest reporter on local radio for all major fights.

I am delighted to bring some of these article features that I wrote for your viewing.

I learned quite a bit in the journalism field back in my younger days that have helped me to be the best I can producing  dmboxing.com  for all.

Featured here are my pre-fight and my post-fight articles on the Larry Holmes vs. Renaldo Snipes WBC heavyweight championship – dated November 1, 1981 and November 8, 1981.

 

Continue reading Pages From The Scrapbook

Young Corbett III

By David Martinez / Boxing Historian / dmboxing.com

Young Corbett III was born Rafelle Capabianca Giordano in the Province of Protenza near Naples, Italy on May 27, 1905. His family emigrated to the United States when Corbett was only a couple of months old, settling in the Pittsburg area.

In 1909 the family moved to Fresno, California and that is where Corbett grew up. As a kid he attended local schools, sold newspapers and shined shoes.

At a young age he took up boxing at a local gym under the guidance of Buzz Martin, a professional boxer.

In the Fall of 1919 at the age of 14 and weighing 90 pounds, Corbett made his professional debut.  After his first five bouts he had a disappointing ring record of 1 win, 2 losses, and 2 draws, with one bout ending in a 4th round knockout loss. This did not discourage Corbett who fought as a southpaw. He fought almost on a monthly basis for the next 13 years, a total of over a 100 fights, against mostly average fighters with the most notable being Filipino great Ceferino Garcia whom he beat twice, both by 10 round decision.

Continue reading Young Corbett III

Greatest Boxer “Pound for Pound” EVER

*** FLASHBACK – This article originally appeared on dmboxing.com on March 2, 2013

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By David Martinez / Boxing Historian / dmboxing.com 

I have been asked many times “who is the greatest boxer of all time in any weight division at the height of his career” and that answer is the easiest for me to come up with – Sugar Ray Robinson. I could go on and on about his career but I will go on record to say that at his pinnacle years he was clearly the best. I was fortunate to meet him at a local amateur boxing show in 1986 where I was a referee for the kids. It was truly a highlight that stands out in my over fifty years of being associated with the sport of boxing.

The photos I am including here, along with an excellent highlight video, are Sugar Ray with his wife Millie and my daughter Laura who was just 9 years old at the time. To shake his hand, get his photos and an autograph that evening will forever live in my mind. I am also including the Sugar Ray Robinson postage stamp which was introduced in April 2006. The only other boxer placed on a U.S. stamp is Joe Louis.
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Sugar Ray Robinson is ranked the greatest boxer of all time by sportswriters, fellow boxers, trainers and historians. The phase “pound for pound” was invented by boxing experts just for him, when they compared fighters regardless of any weight. I use a famous quote from him when coaching kids at a local boxing gym which is “Rhythm is everything in boxing. Every move you make starts with your heart and that’s in rhythm or you’re in trouble”. That is simply the best quote I can think of that sums it up in boxing. Sugar Ray Robinson was born on May 3, 1921 and passed away on April 12, 1989. As an amateur he posted an outstanding ring record of 85-0 with 69 of those wins by knockout, and 40 being in the first round. He turned pro in 1940 at the age of 19 and by 1951 had a professional ring record of 128 – 1- 2 (1 no contest) with 84 by knockout. He held the welterweight title from 1946 to 1951, and won the middleweight title in 1951. He retired in 1952, only to comeback two and a half years later to re-capture the middleweight title in 1955. He was the first boxer to win a divisional world title five times and this was at a time when only one champion in each division was recognized.

Continue reading Greatest Boxer “Pound for Pound” EVER

Mares, Santa Cruz, Hurd, Charlo, Lara – Winners on October 14, 2017 – RECAP

 
By Tom Donelson (BWAA)
Author, Member Boxing Writers Association of America
 
Abner Mares started his bout against Andres Gutierrez with solid boxing, as he used angles to get the better of Gutierrez over the first five rounds. As Gutierrez came out of the sixth round, the ring doctor checked the cut over Gutierrez’s left eye and Gutierrez pushed the action but it did little to stem the tide as Mares continued his assault.  The one thing that Gutierrez had going for himself is that he took Mares best and he kept moving forward in an effort to change the bout.   The seventh thru the ninth, Mares simply pounded Gutierrez and blood continued to spurt out of Gutierrez’s left eye.  During the tenth round, Gutierrez moved forward only to absorb punches from Mares. The eye continued to bleed and the referee stopped the fight in the middle of the tenth round.   Mares looked impressive as he took every round with his boxing skills and never got tempted into going toe to toe with Gutierrez.  His discipline allowed him too easily prevail.
 
 
Leo Santa Cruz faced Chris Avalos for Cruz’s featherweight title. The first round was action pack as Santa Cruz fights tend to be and both fighters let loose.  Santa Cruz was the most accurate.  Through the first four rounds, the fight on compubox was close but Santa Cruz punches had the more pop.  Near the end of the fourth, Santa Cruz buckled Avalos knee and continued to do so in the fifth round as his punches buckle Avalos knee but Avalos continued to fight back.
 

Continue reading Mares, Santa Cruz, Hurd, Charlo, Lara – Winners on October 14, 2017 – RECAP

Boxing Autographs

I was approached at dmboxing.com regarding the sale of a collection of historically significant boxing autographs.  A collection of this magnitude is seldom seen and seldom, if ever, becomes available for purchase.       

Here’s a complete list of these classic autographs and their descriptions:

SONNY LISTON (Signature on paper w/his picture and all best wishes from Sonny Liston – World Heavyweight Champion)

Continue reading Boxing Autographs

Jake LaMotta – R.I.P.

By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

On September 20, 2017 Jake La Motta, middleweight champion whose epic fights with Sugar Ray Robinson are legendary, passed away at the age of 95.

LaMotta was known as the Raging Bull and he fought in 106 bouts in a 14 year colorful brawling career. His Fame led to Martin Scorsese’s 1980 movie Raging Bull, that was nominated for eight Academy Awards and in which Robert DeNiro won best actor for his portrayal of LaMotta.

He fought, who I and top boxing historians consider the greatest fighter of all time, Sugar Ray Robinson six times – twice in a three week span in 1943.  LaMotta won only once, in their second fight which was a 10 round decision, giving Robinson his first loss after 40 straight wins.  This would be Robinson’s only loss in his first 132 professional fights. Their final fight was a grueling intriguing slugfest known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, in Chicago on February 14, 1951, in which LaMotta lost his middleweight title. Robinson won when the referee stopped the fight in the 13th round while LaMotta was hanging on the ropes, helpless and beaten. As the bout ended, LaMotta would say to Robinson “You didn’t put me down Ray, you didn’t put me down Ray!”

Although foes in the ring, he and Robinson were friends outside it. Robinson served as his best man in LaMotta’s sixth wedding.

Continue reading Jake LaMotta – R.I.P.

New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame 2017 Inductions

                           

                                                                                                                              

                                                               FOUNDED NOVEMBER 8, 1968                                                                                                                                President, Henry Hascup                                                                                                       59 Kipp Ave., Lodi, New Jersey 07644                                                                                                    hhascup@yahoo.com  –  www.njboxinghof.org                                                                                          Tel – 973-471-2458  –  Fax – 973-470-8301                                           

The 48th Annual Induction & Award Ceremonies for the New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame will take place on Thursday, November 9th at the Venetian in Garfield, N.J. – Tickets @ $85                                                                                                                                              

                                                                               HONOREES      

         Sal Alessi                 Kenny Bogner          Clarence Coleman            Greg Everett                                         Anthony Hamm                Joey (Eye) Intrieri                   Johnny Molnar                                Bob Rooney Sr.            Marlon Starling                Adrian Stone               Paul Vegliante                                                                   

                                                                         POSTHUMOUSLY                                                                                                    Jimmy Cerello                     Oscar Goode                 Mike Mastandrea

Also, the NEW JERSEY BOXING HALL OF FAME will be honoring our Senior Amateur (Aadam Ali), Junior Olympic Amateur (Emmanuel Chance) & Pro Boxer of the Year (Derrick Webster) as well as the Amateur Official (Andrew Mustacchio) & Coach of the Year (Mike Rizzo), Plus our “2017 Man of the Year” (Chuck Wepner).