Tag Archives: Jim Amato


By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

During the 60′s and the early 1970′s the state of California produced several world class heavyweights. Talented and capable boxers like Eddie Machen, Jerry Quarry, Henry Clark, Thad Spencer, Bill McMurray, Mac Foster and Kenny Norton.

The city of Wilmington was represented by a rough and tough custumer by the name of Joey Orbillo. Joey did not have a lot of fights in a career that lasted less then a decade. He did have a lot of memorable wars. He was a game and brawling crowd pleaser. If it was blood and guts you wanted, Joey gave it to you.

He began his career in the mid-1960′s and was soon swapping leather with the likes of Henry Clark, Johnny Featherman and future world title challenger Manuel Ramos. Joey scored a big victory in March of 1966 outscoring the highly regarded Tony Doyle.

The win over Doyle set the stage for Joey to invade the top layer of the heavyweight division. He was matched with Eddie Machen. The veteran was among the best in the world.On June 23, 1966 he proved to be a little too much for Joey winning a hotly contested ten round split decision.

Continue reading JOEY ORBILLO


Doug Jones and Ernie Terrell (June 1966)

photo courtesy – Jim Carlin

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

What do you say about a fighter who was good enough to challenge for world title recognition in two different weight classes? What do you say about a fighter who holds knockout victories over former world champion and Hall of Famers Carl “Bobo” Olson and Bob Foster?

In all he met six world title holders. He also crossed gloves with top contenders like Eddie Machen, Pete Rademacher, Zora Folley, Billy Daniels, George Chuvalo,Thad Spencer and Boone Kirkman.

Impressive? You bet! Here’s more. He gave “The Greatest” his toughest pre championship fight and to this day there are many who feel that the decision rendered that night was a travesty.

For some people timing is everything. Take Lennox Lewis and Roy Jones Jr. Talented boxers who were fortunate to come along when their respective divisions were void of serious challenges. Then take Jerry Quarry. A talented fighter who just happened to box in the greatest era of the heavyweight division. Go figure.
Continue reading DOUG JONES

Frazier vs. Quarry I (41 Years Since This Heavyweight Classic)

Jerry Quarry, David Martinez (May 1991)

Jerry Quarry and David Martinez (May, 1991)

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

June 23, 1969 at New York’s Madison Square Garden, Joe Frazier met the popular Irish fighter, Jerry Quarry, for the New York State recognized heavyweight title. Back in the day, the New York State Boxing Commission wielded quite a bit of power. Commissioner Edwin Dooley wasted little time stripping Muhammad Ali of his heavyweight title when Ali refused induction into the Armed Forces. The World Boxing Association did the same and they set up a tournament to determine a new champion. Eight top contenders were selected, with unbeaten Joe Frazier being one of them. Frazier’s management declined the invitation, however. The eventual winner of the tourney was Jimmy Ellis, who defeated Jerry Quarry in the finals.

The N.Y.S.A.C. offered Frazier a chance to fight Buster Mathis, who like Frazier, was undefeated. Mathis had defeated Frazier twice in the amateur ranks. The winner would be the champion in New York and a few other states. Well, Frazier met Big Buster and took him out in the eleventh to gain revenge and also win a piece of the heavyweight title.

Although the talented Jimmy Ellis held the more recognized WBA tilte, Frazier was considered by most as the best active heavyweight. They would eventually meet to settle their differences.
Continue reading Frazier vs. Quarry I (41 Years Since This Heavyweight Classic)

Cuban Great, Kid Chocolate

Kid Chocolate
photo courtesy
David Martinez
private collection

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

He was born Eligio Sardinias Montalbo on January 6, 1910 in Cerro, Havana, Cuba. He launched his professional boxing career in 1927 and would participate in over 150 bouts in a career that ended in 1938.

He was nicknamed the ” Cuban Bon Bon ” and during the 1930’s he was one of the best drawing cards in New York. His flashy personality and even flashier style in the ring made him a real crowd pleaser.

After racking up a series of victories in his native Cuba, ” The Kid ” invaded the US in 1928 knocking out Eddie Enos in three rounds in Mineola, N.Y. He would go on to fight at all the popular New York spots like Ridgewood Grove and the St. Nicolas Arena.

On November 30, 1928 at Madison Square Garden the Kid drew with rugged Joey Scalfaro. In 1929 he beat Bushy Graham and Vic Burrone. Then on May 22, 1929 the Kid outscored the great Fidel LaBarba. Kid Chocolate continued to win fights and among his victims were Gregorio Vidal, Al Singer and Dominick Petrone. Continue reading Cuban Great, Kid Chocolate