Danny Valdez / R.I.P.

By David Martinez / Boxing Historian / dmboxing.com

I am deeply saddened by the recent passing of a friend and former standout boxer, Danny Valdez, who passed away on February 28, 2021 at the age of 81 years old 그녀는 예뻤다 2회.

I first saw Danny fight on June 15, 1961 at the historic Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles, California.

I took the Greyhound Bus from Santa Barbara down to Los Angeles (100 mile trip) to meet my uncle on that Thursday to see Danny fight undefeated Tony Herrera (18-0) in their scheduled 12 round bout which was billed as the vacant USA California State Featherweight Championship 다운로드.

Danny won by 8th round knockout, and, ironically, as I remembered that fight, it was my first time seeing another soon-to-be friend, Joey Olmos, who was the referee 사람 아이콘 다운로드.

It was my 13th birthday, and my uncle also treated me the next night to see Freddie Blassie and the wrestling matches at the same venue – the Olympic Auditorium 원랜디 5.1 다운로드.

Danny was a big attraction wherever he fought in his nine year active career, 1957 to 1966.  He was first managed and trained by Art Arvizu at the “J & A Stables” in the East Los Angeles area of “El Hoyo” 내셔널지오그래픽.

Among fighters he faced, some of the best were Dwight Hawkins, Ricardo Gonzalez, Davey Moore, Gil Cadilli, Sugar Ramos, and Richard Sue.

He first won the USA California State title in 1958 vs. Hawkins, then lost the title in 1960 to Billy Thomas. In 1961 (a one year time frame), he regained the title vs. Boots Monroe, lost it to Moore, then regained it vs. Herrera before losing it to Cadilli. Amazingly, he would win back the title on July 1, 1965 vs. Mercer Smith.

Danny fought in many famous venues such as Tucson, San Diego, Mexico City, Nogales, Tijuana, Boise, Las Vegas, Sacramento, San Jose, Portland, San Francisco, and, in the Los Angeles area, at the Hollywood Moulin Rouge nightclub, Hollywood Legion Stadium, Wrigley Field, and the aforementioned Olympic Auditorium.

In his 43 professional fights, Danny posted a ring record of 31 wins (14 by knockout), with 12 losses, and was only stopped twice by two of the greatest, Davey Moore and Sugar Ramos.  He was one of the few that retired from the ring at an early age … 26 years old.

Danny will truly be missed by all that knew him; he was such a kind, loving, and courteous man. The late Don Fraser, past founder and president of the California Boxing Hall of Fame, once told me that “Danny Valdez is truly one of the nicest boxers I have ever known”.

May his soul rest peacefully in heaven with our Lord.

3 thoughts on “Danny Valdez / R.I.P.

  1. David, I want to thank you for writing the article on my father Danny Valdez. I am ver envious of those who were able to see him fight, being that I wasn’t born yet. I was able to see him train a little and box in an exhibition with promoter Brian Avnet of the play Jesus Christ Superstar . This was in the early 70’s at the Universal Amphitheater during intermission , of course dad went easy on Brian ! About dads career, I wanted to point out that he only had 20 or so undefeated amateur bouts and never fought in a amateur national competition like most of his opponents did! Sugar Ramos and Davey Moore were both decorated Olympian’s I’m pretty sure, big difference in experience. Also dads family was poor and probably couldn’t afford good nutrition. Anyways , the great thing about my father is that he never complained or used any of those facts as excuses . He was well trained by Art Arvisu and also was just a natural born fighter! R.I.P. Dad! Thanks again David keep up the good work on perpetuating our love for boxing and remembering those who gave the hearts in and outside the ring! God Bless!
    Danny Valdez Jr.

  2. Excellent article, and I learned about an excellent fighter that I was only vaguely familiar with. Thank you!

  3. Thank you for this write up about my father. I love to hear stories like your!! Also, I believe we met at Dunes a while back. God Bless you!! DeAnn Valdez.

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