Category Archives: Jim Amato

Almost Champions – Part 3 of 3

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008. His opinions and input to this website are honest and to the highest level of expertise. To view all of Jim’s article pieces – go to Categories section and click onto Jim Amato.

clydegray

Clyde Gray was one of the finest boxers to come out of Canada in the 70’s. He gave the great Napoles one of his hardest fights but lost a decision in his first title challenge. Later he would meet Angel Espada for the WBA version of the title and again lose a decision. In his third and final attempt, Clyde was kayoed by Pipino Cuevas. Two other fine welterweights challenged Napoles on two different occasions but could not overcome this outstanding champion. They were Hedgemon Lewis and Ernie ” Red ” Lopez.

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Almost Champions – Part 2 of 3

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008. His opinions and input to this website are honest and to the highest level of expertise … to view all of Jim’s article pieces – go to Categories section and click onto Jim Amato.

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Bennie Briscoe may have been the ” Baddest ” middleweight to never win the title. He finally received a long overdue shot at ” King ” Carlos Monzon and almost pulled the upset when he hurt Monzon in the ninth round. Carlos rallied to win the decision. In a battle for the WBC version of the title Bennie was stopped by the vastly under rated Rodrigo Valdez. After Monzon twice edged Valdez and retired, Bennie met Valdez again for the vacant title and lost a decision. Another worthwhile 160 pound contender during the Monzon era was Jean Claude Bouttier. Carlos beat the Frenchman twice but held him in very high regard.

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Continue reading Almost Champions – Part 2 of 3

Almost Champions – Part 1 of 3

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008. His opinions and input to this website are honest and to the highest level of expertise. To view all of Jim’s article pieces – go to Categories section and click onto Jim Amato.

quarry-crop

The 1970’s spawned such great and dominant champions such as Ali, Frazier, Foreman, Bobby Foster, Monzon, Napoles, Cervantes, Duran, Olivares, Arguello and Zarate. In review of their fine accomplishments and the feats of some other fine champions of that era, several very capable boxers fell short of their dreams of becoming a champion. Let’s take a look t some of these proud warriors. The ” Almost Champions “…

The first who comes to mind is Jerry Quarry. He was as tough as they come and talented too. He received his first title shot in 1968 when he made it to the finals of the WBA elimination tournament. He lost to Jimmy Ellis. In 1969 he met Joe Frazier for the NYSAC version of the title and was halted in seven. In 1970 he was stopped on cuts by Muhammad Ali. If he would have won that fight it would have paved the way for a rematch with Frazier. In 1974 he got that return engagement with Frazier who was now an ex champion. Jerry was stopped in five. If he would have won he would have been in a position to meet the winner of Foreman-Ali.

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Jose Napoles – Was He Too Good For His Own Good?

*** FLASHBACK – this article originally appeared on dmboxing.com on October 7, 2008

Napoles

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008 . His opinions and input to this website are honest and of the highest level. His expertise in boxing is respected and is at the highest degree. To view all of Jim’s articles – go to Categories section & click onto Jim Amato.

The late 1960’s and early 1970’s produced some of the finest, most
dominant champions ever. While Ali, Frazier and Foreman were taking turns
ruling the heavyweights, other divisions found themselves under the
supreme rule of a certain superior boxer.

At light heavyweight “Bad” Bob Foster was the sheriff in town. When
Vincente Rondon disputed that fact he was gunned down in two rounds.

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Why The Post Title Patterson Was Better

Patterson A

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008. His opinions and input to this website are honest and of the highest level. He is an expert in boxing in every sense of the word.

Poor Floyd Patterson. Everyone loves him but not everyone respects him as a fighter or champion. You rarely here his name tossed about when the topic of all time great heavyweights is brought up. What a shame!

Who is to blame for the heartbreaking oversight? People tend to forget that Patterson thrashed Archie Moore much more impressively then Marciano did the night he became the youngest man ever to win the heavyweight crown. Still when a ” Dream Match ” between Marciano and Patterson is talked about, Floyd is quickly dismissed… Simply put, Rocky had the PUNCH and Floyd did not have the whiskers.

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Tony Alongi

AlongiBy Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Tony Alongi was among the better heavyweights of the 1960’s that time has forgotten. Alongi amassed 46 fights from 1959 to 1967. Tony won nine straight fights in his maiden year of 1959. He followed that by winning twelve more in 1960. In 1961 he stepped up the quality of his opposition.  Tony won seven more contests. Among his victims were Tod Herring, Jefferson Davis and George Logan. In 1962 Tony suffered his first setback being stopped in ten rounds by Rodolfo Diaz. He came back to stop Joe DeGrazio in four but in 1963 he was stopped in five by the talented Billy Daniels.

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Billy Walker

BillyWalker

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

NOTE: Jim Amato has contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008. His opinions and input to this website are honest and of the highest level. He is an expert in boxing in every sense of the word.

During the 1960′s British fans were quite stirred by the prospects of a young heavyweight named Billy Walker. He was dubbed the “Blond Bomber” but later because of drawing power he was called the “Golden Boy”. After winning the British amateur title at the age of 22, Walker was enticed to turn pro by a $25,000 signing bonus. He headlined in his first professional fight which took place on March 27, 1962. Walker received $9,000 for the contest which he won by KO. That was serious money at that time. Walker drew so many fans and because of this he never fought a preliminary fight.

In his first dozen bouts Billy went 10-1-1. In his twelfth bout he stopped another heavyweight prospect named Johnny Prescott. In a rematch Walker was on the losing end of a decision. In 1964 Walker won by disqualification against the seasoned Joe Bygraves. Walker was then surprisingly halted by American Bill Nielsen. Walker turned the tables in a return match taking Nielsen out in two rounds. Billy finished 1964 with a point’s verdict over rugged Joe Erskine. Walker was inching his way up the British ratings.

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DREAM FIGHT: Gerry Cooney vs. Chuck Wepner

 Chuck WepnerGerry

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

Gerry Cooney and Chuck Wepner…What an interesting match up that may have been. Gerry could whack but Chuck could sure take it. Size wise they match up fairly well. Gerry had the better skills but if Chuck got inside he knew how to rough house. Unless Gerry could take Chuck out early or at least get his respect, it might have been a long night for Gerry. The longer the fight went the better I like Chuck’s chances.

I wish Gerry would have fought better competition on the way up. Beating faded fighters like Jimmy Young, Ron Lyle and Ken Norton looked good on paper but did little to test him. I feel that Young, Lyle or Norton in their prime could have beat Gerry.

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Matthew Hilton … A Career Un-Fulfilled

 Hilton

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

This was a young man that had world champion written all over him. He had all the potential in the world to have become a boxing superstar. He did achieve the status of world titleholder due to the fragmented title system of the day but I thought he would have accomplished so much more. Only Tony Ayala Jr. in that era disappointed me more. What a great fighter Matthew Hilton could have been.

He defeated former middleweight champion Vito Antuofermo to win his nineteenth straight victory. In win number twenty he demolished the great Wilfred Benitez in nine brutal rounds. What a future was ahead for Matthew Hilton or was it?

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Book Review

Book Review: By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Ezzard Charles

 

BOOK REVIEW : EZZARD CHARLES ; A BOXING LIFE BY WILLIAM DETTLOFF

When I read a book about a prize fighter I want to know the whole story. I want to know about their early life and what led them into the brutal fight game. What they did after their career ended and what legacy did they leave. In the book “Ezzard Charles ; A Boxing Life”, author William Dettloff does an admirable job of covering all the bases.

Mr. Dettloff is an accomplished scribe who spent fifteen years as the Senior Writer for Ring Magazine. It is obvious throughout this book the research and attention to detail the author painstakingly took. Ezzard Charles fought his way to the top in an era loaded with all star talent. Ezzard met the best of those times. Names like Burley, Bivins,Maxim, Moore, Walcott, Marciano and Louis adorn his record. As well as many others.

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