Category Archives: Jim Amato

DREAM FIGHT: Gerry Cooney vs. Chuck Wepner

 Chuck WepnerGerry

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

Gerry Cooney and Chuck Wepner…What an interesting match up that may have been. Gerry could whack but Chuck could sure take it. Size wise they match up fairly well. Gerry had the better skills but if Chuck got inside he knew how to rough house. Unless Gerry could take Chuck out early or at least get his respect, it might have been a long night for Gerry. The longer the fight went the better I like Chuck’s chances.

I wish Gerry would have fought better competition on the way up. Beating faded fighters like Jimmy Young, Ron Lyle and Ken Norton looked good on paper but did little to test him. I feel that Young, Lyle or Norton in their prime could have beat Gerry.

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Matthew Hilton … A Career Un-Fulfilled

 Hilton

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

This was a young man that had world champion written all over him. He had all the potential in the world to have become a boxing superstar. He did achieve the status of world titleholder due to the fragmented title system of the day but I thought he would have accomplished so much more. Only Tony Ayala Jr. in that era disappointed me more. What a great fighter Matthew Hilton could have been.

He defeated former middleweight champion Vito Antuofermo to win his nineteenth straight victory. In win number twenty he demolished the great Wilfred Benitez in nine brutal rounds. What a future was ahead for Matthew Hilton or was it?

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Book Review

Book Review: By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Ezzard Charles

 

BOOK REVIEW : EZZARD CHARLES ; A BOXING LIFE BY WILLIAM DETTLOFF

When I read a book about a prize fighter I want to know the whole story. I want to know about their early life and what led them into the brutal fight game. What they did after their career ended and what legacy did they leave. In the book “Ezzard Charles ; A Boxing Life”, author William Dettloff does an admirable job of covering all the bases.

Mr. Dettloff is an accomplished scribe who spent fifteen years as the Senior Writer for Ring Magazine. It is obvious throughout this book the research and attention to detail the author painstakingly took. Ezzard Charles fought his way to the top in an era loaded with all star talent. Ezzard met the best of those times. Names like Burley, Bivins,Maxim, Moore, Walcott, Marciano and Louis adorn his record. As well as many others.

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For Some, The Sun Did Not Shine

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer
Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

 

We have all heard of Ali, Frazier and Foreman.  Of Tyson and Holyfield. The lighter weight classes have produced the likes of Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns and Sugar Ray Leonard.  Who will ever forget Duran, Pryor and Arguello?What about the “near misses”? The ones who in this day of multi- fractured titles would almost surely have garnered a piece of championship pie.

 

Let’s start with the big boys.  Jerry Quarry failed in his first title try losing a debatable Quarry-cropdecision to underrated Jimmy Ellis.  In his final title shot he was out gunned by “Smokin” Joe Frazier.  He would later lose a rematch to Frazier as well as two bouts to Muhammad Ali.  What if there were four titles available back then?  The wins on Jerry’s resume are impressive to say the least.  Floyd Patterson, Thad Spencer, Buster Mathis, Jack Bodell, Larry Middleton, Mac Foster, Ron Lyle and a one round blow out of Earnie Shavers.  It would be very safe to say that Jerry was among the top four or five heavyweights of that era.  Then it is also safe to assume that he would have copped at least a portion of title recognition.

 

It is very hard for me to believe that John Ruiz could have defeated Jerry.

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Tony Janiro

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

 

This article was a long time coming.  Over the years through my friends in the Youngstown Tony Janiroarea I have learned a lot about the rich boxing history in that region.  I was familiar with Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini but I knew little about his dad Lenny Mancini who passed on the “Boom Boom” moniker to his son.  I knew about hard hitting Harry Arroyo and the murderous body punching of Jeff Lampkin.  I was even able to witness live the tremendous boxing talent of Greg Richardson.  Through my friends I became aware of very special fighters of yesteryear like Tommy Bell, Red D’Amato and Sonny Horne.  So many more that I could mention.  One fighter I heard quite a bit about was a smooth boxing contender who as they say, “put asses in the seats”. He fought in an era when a multitude of rugged contenders roamed the ratings.  He met the best of them and had quite a career. His name was Tony Janiro.

 

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Chartchai Chionoi … should be in the Hall of Fame?

chionoi0003-crop

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer / contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

He was a three time holder of the flyweight title.  He was a major player in the flyweight division for a almost fifteen years.  His record reads like a who’s who of the best flyweights of that era.  He was Thailand’s Chartchai Chionoi.

In 82 battles he emerged with a 61-18-3 record.  He stopped 36 foes while being stopped himself on five occasions. Records can be rather deceiving …he turned pro in 1959.  By 1961 he lost a ten rounder to the talented Mitsunori Seki.  In 1962 Chionoi would drop a decision to future champion Hiroyuki Ebihara.  By this time Chionoi proved he going to be a force to be reckoned with in the near future.

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A Dozen “Super Fight” Duds

Sanchez - Gomez

 

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer
Contributed to  dmboxing.com  since 2008

 

So many so called “Super Fights” have turned out to be “Super Duds” over the years.  True several have provided us with heart stopping thrills.  Still some have left us cold and unfulfilled as one party of the match didn’t quite live up to their end of the deal.

I have come up with twelve such contests that left me most unsatisfied at their conclusion. I’m sure other fans can think of many more that had a similar effect on them.

 

1) Salvador Sanchez – Wilfredo Gomez… Sanchez was a young, solid champion but Gomez was, Gomez. The man that had destroyed the invincible Carlos Zarate.  Well Salvador proved to the world and Gomez that he was an all-time great.  Wilfredo was down in the first and outclassed the rest of the way until it was stopped in round eight.

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“Philadelphia” Pal Moore

pal
By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer for  dmboxing.com  since 2008

Although Memphis Pal Moore was once a title  claimant and the possessor of a fine record, he should not be confused with Pal Moore out of Philadelphia. In fact, the Pal from the City of Brotherly Love may have been the overall better fighter.

 
Philadelphia Pal Moore was a member of the famous “Fighting Moore Family” which included brothers Willie, Reddy, and Frank. He was born Paul Von Franzke October 1891, in Germany. He began his professional career in 1907 in Philadelphia. By 1909 he had invaded New York and began to draw attention. By 1910, he had hit the big time. On February 1st of that year he stopped Henry Miers in Boston prompting ex-heavyweight champion James J. Corbett who was in attendance to heap praise on Pal. On May 25th Pal scored an upset six round newspaper verdict over the heralded Jim Driscoll. In his last five bouts for 1910 he twice met Owen Moran losing a newspaper decision and then holding Moran to a draw. He then lost newspaper verdicts to Abe Attel, Harlem Tommy Murphy, and Tommy Langdon.

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Jean Claude Bouttier

Jean

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

To me Jean Claude Bouttier was one of the best fighters of a great era who never won a world title. He joins Pierre Fourrie, Yaqui Lopez, Bennie Briscoe, Hedgemon Lewis, Ernie  “Red ” Lopez, Armando Muniz and Ray Lampkin who were boxers fighting in the wrong place at the wrong time. Even some boxers who held a fragment of a title never got the recognition they deserved because of other dominant champions. Men like Rodrigo Valdez, Esteban DeJesus and Howard Winstone.

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