Category Archives: Jim Amato

“Philadelphia” Pal Moore

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By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer for  dmboxing.com  since 2008

Although Memphis Pal Moore was once a title  claimant and the possessor of a fine record, he should not be confused with Pal Moore out of Philadelphia. In fact, the Pal from the City of Brotherly Love may have been the overall better fighter.

 
Philadelphia Pal Moore was a member of the famous “Fighting Moore Family” which included brothers Willie, Reddy, and Frank. He was born Paul Von Franzke October 1891, in Germany. He began his professional career in 1907 in Philadelphia. By 1909 he had invaded New York and began to draw attention. By 1910, he had hit the big time. On February 1st of that year he stopped Henry Miers in Boston prompting ex-heavyweight champion James J. Corbett who was in attendance to heap praise on Pal. On May 25th Pal scored an upset six round newspaper verdict over the heralded Jim Driscoll. In his last five bouts for 1910 he twice met Owen Moran losing a newspaper decision and then holding Moran to a draw. He then lost newspaper verdicts to Abe Attel, Harlem Tommy Murphy, and Tommy Langdon.

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Jean Claude Bouttier

Jean

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

To me Jean Claude Bouttier was one of the best fighters of a great era who never won a world title. He joins Pierre Fourrie, Yaqui Lopez, Bennie Briscoe, Hedgemon Lewis, Ernie  “Red ” Lopez, Armando Muniz and Ray Lampkin who were boxers fighting in the wrong place at the wrong time. Even some boxers who held a fragment of a title never got the recognition they deserved because of other dominant champions. Men like Rodrigo Valdez, Esteban DeJesus and Howard Winstone.

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Jorge Ahumada … “Almost a Champion”

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By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer (contributed to “dmboxing” since 2008)

In the early 1970′s he was the hottest light heavyweight in the world. He would eventually garner three shots at recognition as champion. All three would travel the true champiomship distance of fifteen rounds. In all three Jorge would come up short.
Jorge turned pro in 1968 in his native Argentina. In his home country he would meet future champion Victor Galindez four times. Jorge would win one by decision. On three occasions he was stopped by the great Galindez. They would meet again.

He split a pair of fights with the highly respected Avenamer Peralta. He also drew with the highly regarded Raul Loyola. When he decided to invade the US in the summer of 1973 he sported a 31-5-1 record. Little did he know the impact he would make when he hit New York City.

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Jose Legra … should he be in the Hall of Fame?

Legra

 

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer / contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

 

He was a two time world champion and a perennial contender for the featherweight title for more then a decade. In a fifteen year career he amassed 150 fights. He won 134 of them. At one point in his career he reeled off over 50 straight wins. Are these the credentials for a future Hall of fame inductee?

Born in Cuba in 1943, Legra turned pro in 1960. Although active, most of his early fights took place in Cuba and Mexico. He made his first appearance in Spain in 1963. It is there that he decided to live and ply his trade. He was tall, lean and very fast. He would befuddle his opponents with his grace and boxing skills. He would emerge as a serious threat for world honors.

In 1965 Legra took a big step up meeting future champion Howard Winstone of Wales. The vastly talented Winstone defeated young Jose over ten rounds. Legra would not lose again until 1969. Some 50+ bouts later. On his march to a title fight Legra would defeat the likes of Love Allotey, Rafiu King, Don Johnson, Yves Desmarets (for the EBU title) and Joe Tetteh. This led to a 1968 title shot against the newly crowned WBC featherweight titleholder, Howard Winstone. The rugged Winstone had failed no less then three times to dethrone the great Vincente Saldivar. All three were great battles. Finally when Saldivar retired Winstone was matched with Japan’s worthy Mitsunori Seki for the WBC version of the vacated crown. Winstone finally cashed in halting the game Seki in round nine. Now it was Legra’s turn. It was sweet revenge for Jose as he dropped Winstone twice in the first round and damaged Howard’s eye badly enough to force a stoppage in round five.

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Roy Jones, Jr. “The Best Ever” at 168 pounds?

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By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer / Contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

 

ROY DOLL picWho was the best 168 pound boxer since the inception of the weight class in 1984. Many will favor Joe Calzaghe because of his numerous title defenses. It would be hard not to say Leonard or Hearns as their classic battle at 168 lbs. ended in a controversial draw. Really neither boxer spent a lot of time in this weight class to make a major impact. Well for my money I feel the most formidable super middleweight titleholder was Roy Jones Jr. In the two years he held the crown he made six successful defenses, all by knockout.

 

Roy won the title by defeating unbeaten James Toney. This much anticipated Super Bout took place on November 18, 1994. Toney had won the title in 1993 with an impressive stoppage of Iran Barkley. Entering the Las Vegas ring to face Jones, Toney sported a 44-0-2 record. The fight wasn’t even close. Jones scored a flash knockdown over Toney in the third round. Roy then proceeded to walk off with the title by scores of 119-108, 118-109 and 117-111.

 

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Book Review

Book Review: By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

Book Review

BOOK REVIEW ; “BECOMING TAZ” BY JEFF BUMPUS. INTRODUCTION BY PHIL RICE

In 1984 a young 140 pound fighter from the Midwest entered the ranks of professional boxers with the dream of becoming a world champion. He was a straight forward, no nonsense southpaw who would throw punches from bell to bell. In a nutshell, he was a crowd pleaser. It was this style that earned him several appearances on the ESPN and USA cable boxing networks. His name is Jeff Bumpus and he carried the nickname “The Tazmanian Devil”. He would eventually learn that his dream would not become reality.

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Sir Henry Cooper

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By Jim Amato (Senior Boxing Writer)

He came from a fighting family and by the time his boxing career ended in 1971 he was the most beloved British boxer of all time. Only once did he challenge for the world’s title but he dominated the British heavyweight scene for over fifteen years. His popularity soared even more after retirement and eventually the Queen of England knighted him. Sir Henry Cooper was more than just a British fighter. He was a fine example of what British boxing is all about. 

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What if ? … James Toney vs. Michael Moorer

James Toney Michael Moorer

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

 

This is a fight that would have made sense if it was put together. Each boxer has ties to the state of Michigan.  It probably didn’t happen because by the time Toney became a heavyweight, Moorer’s star had diminished due to his one round kayo loss to David Tua.  A loss two years later to Eliseo Castillo pretty much took Moorer out of the elite class. Toney’s knockout of Evander Holyfield made him a major player in the division.
 
What if Moorer and Toney would have met at their heavyweight peaks ?  Who would have come out on top.  This could have been a very interesting battle. How would Toney have handled Moorer’s southpaw stance ?  What about Moorer’s quick, hard and accurate right jab ?  How would Moorer have dealt with Toney’s defensive wizardry and his pinpoint counter punching ability ?

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Canada’s Robert Cleroux beat Chuvalo twice

Bob Cleroux 1969

 

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer

 
No doubt the most well known heavyweight to come out of Canada is George Chuvalo. For a while Lennox Lewis called it his home and Trevor Berbick made his mark but George is still #1 in Canada. Nevertheless there is a very overlooked heavyweight contender from the 1960’s who at one time was closing in on a world title shot. His name was Robert Cleroux. The fact is that “Big Bob” had a trilogy of bouts with Chuvalo for the Canadian heavyweight title. Cleroux won two of those contests.

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The Preception

The Preception

By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer / contributed to “dmboxing.com” since 2008

It is not fun growing old. I am a product of my past.  A victim of my era so to speak. I constantly bump heads with the young fans of today. They glorify Hopkins, Manny, Mayweather and the Klitschko brothers. Even from a decade or so before it’s all about Holyfield, Whitaker and a guy named Mike Tyson. They are all great fighters in their own right. Then you can go back a little farther. Now we’re talking Holmes, Duran, Hagler, Leonard, Hearns, Pryor, Michael Spinks and Benitez. How about Julio Cesar Chavez, Edwin Rosario and the great Salvador Sanchez ? Some great names and outstanding fighters.

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