Category Archives: Hall Of Fame

Dub Harris R.I.P.

 Johnny Ortiz, Dub Harris, David Martinez
( photo taken October 18, 2002 )
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*** FLASHBACK – this article originally appeared on dmboxing on July 21, 2011 … In Memory of Dub Harris (R.I.P.) I am re-posting in his honor.

 

By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Last month the boxing world lost a friend, Maurice “Dub” Harris, who passed away peacefully on June 27, 2011 at the age of 94. He was a highly decorated veteran of the United States Army serving in both World War II and the Korean War.

Dub, along with Everett Sanders (original founder), Charlie Casas, and Gordon Del Faro, was one of the charter members of the World Boxing Hall of Fame that started in 1980. Dub served five terms as president (1982), (1985), (1989-1990), (1995-1996), (1997-1998). Dub remained active as Chairman of the Board and President’s Advisor until failing health in 2005 forced him to depart the World Boxing Hall of Fame after twenty five years of dedicated service with the goal to always strive for excellence.

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WBC Legends of Boxing Museum 2016 Event

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Come join a great boxing event – The WBC Legends of Boxing Museum 2016 Hall of Fame!

This is a premier boxing hall of fame venue that honors boxers and other boxing related personnel for their outstanding accomplishments.

This years’ show will take place on Saturday, December 3, 2016, 1:00pm, at the American Sports University, 399 North “D” Street, San Bernardino, California 92404.  

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International Boxing Hall of Fame 2016

Official Induction Ceremony Set For Sunday, June 12, 2016

CANASTOTA, NY – For boxers Lupe Pintor and Hilario Zapata, judge Harold Lederman, commissioner Marc Ratner, journalist Jerry Izenberg and broadcaster Col. Bob Sheridan, their day in the sun is rapidly approaching. On Sunday, June 12th they will join boxing’s immortals when they are officially inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastota, New York.

PHOTO IBHOF

“We are eagerly anticipating paying tribute to the incredible accomplishments of the members of the Class of 2016,” said Hall of Fame Executive Director Edward Brophy. “We look forward to welcoming them to Canastota to take their place in the Hall of Fame.”

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International Boxing Hall of Fame Announces 2016 Inductees

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

I would like to personally congratulate my friend Harold Lederman on the recent announcement of his upcoming induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Harold

He is most deserving and in a comment upon receiving his induction news he stated:  “I’m so excited. It’s one of the greatest things that has ever happened to me. I’m so proud. It’s mind boggling. It’s so important to be elected into the Hall of Fame. I think this is wonderful. I’m so happy. It’s amazing.”

Continue reading International Boxing Hall of Fame Announces 2016 Inductees

World Boxing Council (WBC) Legends Event is a KNOCKOUT!

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

I was truly humbled to be an inductee this past Sunday, May 17, 2015, into the WBC Legends of Boxing Museum Hall of Fame. The “gala” event was attended by 350 people and took place at the American Sports University in San Bernardino, California with Bill Dempsey Young serving as Master of Ceremony.

WBC RatingsOur host in charge was Jamie Ochoa (Co-Chairman WBC LBM).  Other Executive Board Members  are: Jose Sulaiman (Life Time President), Mauricio Sulaiman (WBC President), Rudy Tellez (Chairman, WBC LBM), Angel Ochoa (Vice President WBC LBM), and Jill Diamond (Advisory Committee).

If I were to say THANK YOU a hundred times it would not be enough for such an honor, and for such a memorable day in my life that I will never ever forget.

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Besides myself, this year’s honorees were: Hedgemon Lewis, Blinky Rodriquez, Mack Kurihara, Alex Ramos, Joel De La Hoya, Thell Torrence, Victor Ortiz, Raul Perez, James Toney, Leobardo Ibarra, Gennady Golovkin, and actor Ryan O’Neal.

Continue reading World Boxing Council (WBC) Legends Event is a KNOCKOUT!

WBC Legends of Boxing Museum Induction and Awards Ceremony

I would like to thank Publisher and Editor Alice San Andres – Calleja of the Santa Barbara based newspaper The Mesa Paper / May 2015 Edition for her (this) nice article feature.

The event is a week away and limited tickets remain sill available by contacting Jaime Ochoa (951) 378-9634 … other honorees include: Joel De La Hoya, Gennady Golovkin, Blinky Rodriguez, Victor Ortiz, Mack Kurhara, James Toney, Hedgemon Lewis, Ryan O’Neal, Raul Perez, Thell Torrance, Alex Ramos, and Leo Ibarra Bracamontes.

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WBC Legends of Boxing Museum 2015 Event

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

I was recently notified by the WBC (World Boxing Council) Legends of Boxing Museum that I have been selected to be inducted into their Hall of Fame.

WBC RatingsIn their letter they expressed, “That due to my enormous and phenomenal achievements in boxing, I have been selected to forever be enshrined.”   I am honored and it is always special when you are recognized by your peers in the sport you love dearly.

I have been involved in boxing since 1961, a kid that was drawn to boxing like a duck to water.  Boxing has been imbedded into my life for over a half a century and I have been blessed to have met so many wonderful people and to have witnessed so many great fights.  My website www.dmboxing.com is my pleasure to provide my wealth of knowledge in boxing to everyone interested.

The event will take place on Sunday, May 17, 2015, 11:00am, at the American Sports University located at 399 N. “D” Street, San Bernardino, CA 92404. For further information, please contact Jaime Ochoa (951) 378-9634 Jaime.ringleader@gmail.com or Angel Ochoa (951) 333-5739 Angel.ringleader@gmail.com

“World Colored Heavyweight Championship”

By David Martinez / Boxing Historian

Let me bring you a feature story that you will probably not read anywhere regarding, all together, the five best black heavyweights at the turn of the 20th century.

I got the idea when I overheard some mutual friends talking about the best black baseball players that never got the chance to play in the major leagues, and had to settle playing against each other in the old negro league.

I have rated many boxers in many categories throughout my 50 years of  boxing … on this website alone you will find that I have rated the best heavyweights, the best lightweights, the best Mexicans fighters, and now I will personally rate the best black heavyweights in a time period that but only one of them, Jack Johnson, had the opportunity to fight for the heavyweight championship.

But before Johnson came into the scene, I must acknowledge Peter Jackson. He was a true pioneer in the brass knuckle days, and the first black heavyweight that set the stage for the top recognition of the black boxers, and that was before the turn of the 20th century.

Racial prejudice was the only thing that kept Jackson from his chance to win the heavyweight championship. In a ten year span, 1882-1892, in which Jackson was in his prime, the heavyweight champion was John L. Sullivan, who stated that he would never fight a negro for his crown.

Just before Sullivan lost his coveted belt, in 1892, to James J Corbett, a year prior to that fight in 1891 Jackson fought Corbett to a grueling 61 round draw, in a bout that lasted over four hours. Jackson would never fight Corbett once he held the title, and lost to another future heavyweight champion Jim Jeffries seven years later after the Corbett fight, in a fight that virtually ended his career.

Jackson “aka” The Black Prince was considered by many boxing experts (even to this to this day) at the peak of his career as one of the most complete heavyweights ever.

#1 Jack Johnson

After the turn of the 20th century, I rate Jack Johnson the best at that time, and in his prime he was truly the top heavyweight. Johnson was a master defensive boxer, and well ahead of his time among any of the great boxers, black or white in his era. He won the heavyweight championship when he was 32 years old, Ali was 22, and Joe Louis was 23. He was the central figure in the most dramatic fight in heavyweight boxing history; his July 4, 1910, bout with Jim Jeffries caused more national repercussions than any thing ever seen in the sport. Johnson fought the best of his time, and lost the championship to Jess Willard on a “controversial” knockout. The late Nat Fleischer, Ring Magazine founder, said Johnson was simply the best heavyweight champion ever. That is also my opinion.

#2) Harry Wills

Possibly the greatest heavyweight that never won the title. He was ranked many times as a top contender for Johnson’s belt, but they never fought. He also was ranked the number one contender, when Jack Dempsey was champion, but they never fought.

Wills, was forced to fight continuously against many of the best black fighters in his era such as Sam Langford, Sam McVey, and Joe Jeannette, but in a career that spanned six heavyweight champions, not once did he get a title shot.

Wills was known as The Black Panther, and was a big six-foot, three inches, and 220 pounds. Although many of his early bouts were unrecorded, I found his ring record to be 65 wins, 8 losses, 2 draws, 47 knockouts, with 25 no-decisions, 3 no-contests. His best punch was a right cross that was so powerful, that in his 47 wins by KO, those lasted an average of only three rounds.

Had he been given the opportunity to fight for the title, I truly believe he would have changed the history of boxing and would have been the second black heavyweight champion.

#3) Sam Langford

Recognized by the late Nat Fleischer, Ring magazine founder, the seventh best heavyweight of all time, and in a current issue of Ring Magazine rated him number two on their all time list of best punchers.

Langford was known as the Boston Tar Baby, and he was not a big heavyweight in statue, only five foot, seven inches, 185 pounds. His career spanned a quarter of a century, 1902 to 1926, with 164 wins, 38 losses, 37 draws, 117 knockouts, with 48 no-decisions, 3 no-contests.

Langford, was truly considered by many boxing historians, including myself, as good as any heavyweight during the first 15 years of the 20th century.

#4) Joe Jeanette

Actually a look-a-like in styles to Sam Langford, was not big by heavyweight standards, at five foot ten inches, 190 pounds. His ring record was most impressive: 79 wins, nine losses, 6 draws, 66 knockouts, with 62 no-decisions, 1 no-contest.

He is best known for his quote to Jack Johnson, in which he repeatedly said “that Jack forgot about his old (black) friends after he became champion and drew the color line against his own people.”

Jeanette had fought Johnson seven times prior to Johnson winning the title, and held his own with one win, one loss, one draw, and four no-decisions. He also fought Langford 15 times, and holds a 15 round decision over future light heavyweight champion Georges Carpentier.

His most memorable fight was in 1909 against Sam McVey, in which he over came 27 knockdowns to win by knockout in 50 rounds, a fight that lasted three-and-a-half hours, and was recorded as the longest fight of the 20th century.

#5) Sam McVey

Some refer him to McVea. He was actually a Mike Tyson look-a-like in many ways. He was compact, had a powerful physique, with tremendous punching power, as he stood 5 foot ten inches, and at a solid 215 pounds. His ring record was 65 wins, 15 losses, 11 draws, 47 knockouts, with 1 no-decision, 4 no-contests.

At one point in his career, from 1906 to 1912, in 43 bouts fought he had a stretch of 38 victories, 2 losses, and 3 draws, with an incredible 32 knockouts – with the two lone losses only to Joe Jeanette.

He fought Jack Johnson three times early in his career, with less than ten fights under his belt and before he was even 20 years old and lost all three times, Johnson was 26 years old and had over forty fights under his belt. The two would never fight again after Johnson won the world heavyweight championship in 1908.

Although boxing historians will agree that his 50 round bout with Jeanette in 1909 was a classic, and is was, McVey’s best winning performance was on June 29, 1915 against Sam Langford. He won a 12 round decision in which McVey had Langford on the verge of a knockout in the 8th round, in a thrilling fight from start to finish.

In closing, from Peter Jackson to the five I have mentioned above, ironically each one of these men at one time in their famed careers held what was called during their era – the “World Colored Heavyweight Championship.”