Category Archives: Heavyweights

World Colored Heavyweight Championship

***** FLASHBACK ~ This article originally appeared on dmboxing.com in November 2012

thCA27MP15
By David Martinez / Boxing Historian

Let me bring you a feature story that you will probably not read any where regarding, all together, the five best black heavyweights at the turn of the 20th century.

I got the idea when I over heard some mutual friends talking about the best black baseball players that never got the chance to play in the major leagues, and had to settle playing against each other in the old negro league.

I have rated many boxers in many categories throughout my over 50 years of boxing … on this website alone you will find that I have rated the best heavyweights, the best lightweights, the best Mexicans fighters, and now I will personally rate the best black heavyweights in a time period that but only one of them, Jack Johnson, had the opportunity to fight for the heavyweight championship.

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Best Punchers – The Heavyweights

*** FLASHBACK ~ This article originally appeared on dmboxing.com in June 2012

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Here is my list of the 15 best punchers in the heavyweight division from the start of the Marquis of Queensberry era, (i.e.) 1892 to the present.  A formula that I am using to help illustrate this for each boxer is to show their percentage of knockouts which is calculated by the number of wins they had with the number of knockouts in those wins.  This formula isn’t intended to determine the order in which I have placed them; the order also includes my opinion of them as punchers.

I am not concerned about “who beat who”, how many times they were knocked out themselves or the results if they would have fought each other.  Their physical size or if they were a world champion has no bearing – this is strictly based on strength of punching power with the opponents they fought.  Why isn’t Muhammad Ali on this list?  Personally, I would take Ali to beat any of these punchers on my list – but mostly by decision wins and not by knockouts.  When I write rankings of boxers in any capacity I always get disagreements and feedback, so please know that I respect your opinions, and hope you will respect mine.

#1) Joe Louis (66 wins / 52 by KO = 78.7 %) Heavyweight champion 1940-1949. Defended title a record 25 times. He was a smooth, deadly puncher with tremendous power in either hand. His combinations had perfect accuracy with overwhelming power.

#2) George Foreman (76 wins / 69 by KO = 90.7 %) Two time heavyweight champion 1973-1974 and 1994-1997. He is recognized as one of the hardest hitters ever in boxing in any weight division. He is forth on my list in the percentage category of knockouts.

#3) Sonny Liston (50 wins / 39 by KO – 78.0 %) Heavyweight champion 1962-1964. The most intimidating heavyweight ever, his left jab alone was so powerful that it knocked opponents out – the jab – and his left hook was nothing less than devastating.

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Klitschko over Jennings – retains title belts … Ali over Santana

fight April 25 - 2
By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Wladimir Klitschko (64-3 / 54 by KO) successfully defended his IBF/WBO/WBA heavyweight title belts for the 18th time in a row with a unanimous decision over Bryant Jennings (19-1 / 10 by KO) in a fight that was held in a sold out Madison Square Garden, New York and airing on HBO.

Klitschko used his lethal  jab to pile up points, as Jennings made it interesting in just lasting 12 rounds with the champion.  Jennings fought defensively for most of the fight with hands up high, but did have his moments by opening up and being first with his punches and becoming the aggressor.

fight April 25 - A

But at the end, Klitschko threw more and his jab was just right on target throughout the bout and there was never any doubt in what the out come was to be.

The judges scores were 116-111, 116-111, 118-109 for Klitschko, who had a point deducted in round 10 for excessive holding. … my unofficial scorecard was 117-110.

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Wilder wins WBC title

WBC title fight

By Tom Donelson / Member Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA)

Deontay Wilder won a unanimous decision but what impressed me was not his victory but the ease that he dominated the fight and showed himself to be a vastly improved fighter.  The first thing that was surprising was that the inexperienced Wilder showed more nuance in his fight game than the supposedly more experience Stiverne.  (While Wilder had more pro fights; Stiverne had fought the tougher fighters and had already been in two big events against Chris Arreola.)

Wilder used his longer reach and jab to set the real estate between the two fighters.  Stirvene, whose jab was an effective weapon against Arreola, fail to even effectively jab nor did he cut off the ring.  Repeatedly Wilder was able to escape and move away from the on charging Stirvene.  Stirvene attempted to walk Wilder down but he never attack the body of Wilder; which would have paid dividend in the later rounds against Wilder.  Instead, he rarely jabbed his way nor did he attack the body with much conviction or consistently. 

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Bermane vs. Wilder … WBC heavyweight title

title fight Jan 2015

By Tom Donelson / Member Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA)

Deontay Wilder takes on Bermane Stiverne in an event that is totally unusual; an American in a heavyweight bout that means something.   Stiverne’s WBC heavyweight title is on the line and the undefeated Wilder has the opportunity to win a heavyweight, something no Americans have done since Shannon Briggs defeated Siarhei Liakovich for Liakovich WBO title nearly nine years ago.

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Book Review

In the Ring With Jack Johnson  Part I The Rise front coverAt 710 pages, In the Ring With Jack Johnson – Part I: The Rise by Adam J. Pollack is the most detailed and thorough book ever written on Jack Johnson. This book alone (the first of two on Johnson) covers the start of Jack Johnson’s career up to his winning the world heavyweight championship. It is chock-full of detailed descriptions of each bout from multiple local next-day primary sources. The book also contains plenty of context and background, details and perspectives about race from both white and black-owned newspapers, as well as approximately 225 rare photographs, cartoons, and advertisements. Boxing fans will obtain knowledge and insight into Jack Johnson’s life and career like never before.

 

This is the seventh book in Adam J. Pollack’s series on the heavyweight champions of the gloved era, which include: John L. Sullivan: The Career of the First Gloved Heavyweight Champion, In the Ring With James J. Corbett, In the Ring With Bob Fitzsimmons, In the Ring With James J. Jeffries, In the Ring With Marvin Hart, and In the Ring With Tommy Burns. Adam J. Pollack is a boxing judge, referee, and coach, and member of the Boxing Writers Association of America. He is also an attorney practicing law in Iowa City, Iowa.

 $39.95. Hardcover. 710 pages.

Available via amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, and other online dealers.

Win By KO Publications (winbykopublications.com).

“World Colored Heavyweight Championship”

By David Martinez / Boxing Historian

 

Let me bring you a feature story that you will probably not read any where regarding, all together, the five best black heavyweights at the turn of the 20th century.

I got the idea when I over heard some mutual friends talking about the best black baseball players that never got the chance to play in the major leagues, and had to settle playing against each other in the old negro league.

I have rated many boxers in many categories throughout my over 50 years of boxing … on this website alone you will find that I have rated the best heavyweights, the best lightweights, the best Mexicans fighters, and now I will personally rate the best black heavyweights in a time period that but only one of them, Jack Johnson, had the opportunity to fight for the heavyweight championship.

Continue reading

A Night of Heavyweights and Chavez Shows Improvement

By Tom Donelson
 (Member Boxing Writers Assc.)

On NBC, it was a night of heavyweight beginning with Bryant Jennings facing Steve Collins. Collins came into the fight with only one knock out in his last fourteen victories after winning his first eleven fights by knockout.   The first round was a feeling out round as neither fighter threw much but Jennings got his jab going and started to open up.
This became more prominent in the third round as Jennings added his left hook and right hand to the mix as he started to score.  In the fifth round, Jennings landed two left jabs followed by a right hand which sent Collins to the rope and the only thing that kept Collins from going down was the rope.

From this point, it was all Jennings but there were times that Jennings relaxed and allowed Collins to stay in the fight.  Collins could no longer hurt Jennings after the third round and Jennings landed several combinations including upper cuts, right hands along with hooks to the body and head.   The biggest flaw was his failure to finish off Steve Collins; who had nothing left over the last two rounds and wasn’t even really throwing any punches.  Collins was hoping to make it through the last two rounds to end the fight on his feet.    Jennings won the fight easy and showed growth but part of growth as a Heavyweight contender is to stop people who are your inferior.

In the main event featured Tomasz Adamek and Fast Eddie Chambers in a bout between two heavyweights who want one more shot at a title and a loss could end that shot.   Chambers came into the fight at the lightest in his career and Adamek came in slightly heavier.  Chambers began the fight by jabbing and moving while Adamek moved forward but unable to connect on solid shots due to Chambers’ defense.
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Best Punchers ~ The Heavyweights

Here is my list of the 15 best punchers in the heavyweight division from the start of the Marquis of Queensberry era, (i.e.) 1892 to the present. A formula that I am using to help illustrate this for each boxer is to show their percentage of knockouts which is calculated by the number of wins they had with the number of knockouts in those wins.  This formula isn’t intended to determine the order in which I have placed them; the order also includes my opinion of them as punchers.

I am not concerned about “who beat who”, how many times they were knocked out themselves or the results if they would have fought each other.  Their physical size or if they were a world champion has no bearing – this is strictly based on strength of punching power with the opponents they fought. Why isn’t Muhammad Ali on this list?  Personally, I would take Ali to beat any of these punchers on my list – but mostly by decision wins and not by knockouts. When I write rankings of boxers in any capacity I always get disagreements and feedback, so please know that I respect your opinions, and hope you will respect mine.

#1) Joe Louis (66 wins / 52 by KO = 78.7 %) Heavyweight champion 1940-1949. Defended title a record 25 times. He was a smooth, deadly puncher with tremendous power in either hand. His combinations had perfect accuracy with overwhelming power.

#2) George Foreman (76 wins / 69 by KO = 90.7 %) Two time heavyweight champion 1973-1974 and 1994-1997. He is recognized as one of the hardest hitters ever in boxing in any weight division. He is forth on my list in the percentage category of knockouts.

#3) Sonny Liston (50 wins / 39 by KO – 78.0 %) Heavyweight champion 1962-1964. The most intimidating heavyweight ever, his left jab alone was so powerful that it knocked opponents out – the jab – and his left hook was nothing less than devastating.

#4) Rocky Marciano (49 wins / 43 by KO = 87.7 %) Heavyweight champion 1952-1956. He retired undefeated. Had limited skills and had a weight disadvantage, but his tremendous will to win overshadowed that with bigger opponents; his fights averaged a remarkable fewer than 5 rounds per bout.  Was responsible for the greatest knockout in heavyweight history in his 1952 title win over Jersey Joe Walcott in round 13 despite being behind on all scorecards.

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