California Boxing Hall of Fame 2015

The upcoming California Boxing Hall of Fame is less than three months away, October 24, 2015, and hopefully boxing fans will come out in support for this great event.

President Don Fraser does a wonderful job hosting the gala event, which honors current and past boxers, and personal for their outstanding accomplishments in boxing.

The event begins at 11am with lunch to be served, to be followed shortly with induction ceremonies. The location is the Sportsmen’s Lodge, 12833 Ventura Blvd, Studio City, CA 91604 … phone (818) 755-5000 … tickets are priced at $50.00 (tax, tip included).

For information you may call Don Fraser (818) 761-4887 or contact by email: neicyrox@sbcglobal.net

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Kovalev by “KO” over Mohammedi … Pascal wins “disputed” decision over Gonzalez

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Sergey Kovalev (28-0-1 / 25 by KO) defended IBF/WBO/WBA his light heavyweight titles with ease over Nadjib Mohammedi (37-4 / 23 by KO) by a third round knockout.

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The bout was never in doubt from the opening bell, as the unbeaten Kovalev dominated every second of every minute of every round.  Kovalev dropped Mohammedi with a series of right hands in round two and finished him with right / left combination in round three.

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Hey Harold!

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My good friend Harold Lederman of HBO World Championship Boxing kindly provides this website with his short video links regarding upcoming fights. Here’s a look at the IBF/WBO/WBA light heavyweight championship, scheduled for 12 rounds, Sergey Kovalev (27-0-1 / 24 by KO) vs. Nadjib Mohammedi (37-3  / 23 by KO) airing on HBO, Saturday, July 25, in Las Vegas at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

(click onto link below to view video)

Chavez Jr. wins by decision over Reyes

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By Tom Donelson / Member Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA)

Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. biggest problem is his last name and heritage.  If he was Julio Ramirez and didn’t have a famous Hall of Fame fighter as a father, we would say that he is a good fighter, a contender and note that he held for a brief time, a piece of the Middleweight championship.  The reality is that being Chavez Jr. is a curse since we expect so much more and certainly seeing him losing to Andrzej Fonfara by not coming out for the tenth round was a stunner for those who remember his father for the warrior he was.

Marco Reyes was picked as the comeback fight for obvious reason, he was a natural Middleweight who had not fight the quality of opposition Chavez has and from the first round, it was obvious that while Reyes knocked out 24 fighters in his 33 wins;  that his punch did not match Chavez’s power at Super Middleweight. And Chavez did came in overweight; leaving many questioning how does a fighter who supposedly trained like he never before and sparred 100 rounds under the guidance of Robert Garcia, come in overweight?

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The first round saw Chavez retreating almost the entire round until near the end before he unleashed his first offensive volley. From the second round through the fifth round, Chavez put the pressure on and while Reyes would box and connect on combinations; it was Chavez who would take control of the round with his piston like jab followed by left hooks and right hands. Throughout the sixth round, Reyes boxed his way as he landed combinations and Chavez didn’t use the jab or punch his way. Chavez tried to steal the round with a four punch volley at the end of the round. Showtime Steve Farhood had Chavez ahead halfway through by 58-56.

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Ruslan Chagaev Retains WBA Title by “early” Knockout

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Recap from dmboxing.com

I am pleased to report that Steve Corbo, a guest writer who often contributes to this website, recently returned from Germany, where he was the Ring Announcer for a couple of title fights. The main event, on July 11, 2015,  was the WBA Heavyweight Championship Ruslan Chagaev (34-2-1 / 21 KOs) vs. Francesco Pianeta (31-2-1 / 17 KOs) at the GETEC Arena in Magdeburg, Germany. 

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Chartchai Chionoi … should be in the Hall of Fame?

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By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer / contributed to dmboxing.com since 2008

He was a three time holder of the flyweight title.  He was a major player in the flyweight division for a almost fifteen years.  His record reads like a who’s who of the best flyweights of that era.  He was Thailand’s Chartchai Chionoi.

In 82 battles he emerged with a 61-18-3 record.  He stopped 36 foes while being stopped himself on five occasions. Records can be rather deceiving …he turned pro in 1959.  By 1961 he lost a ten rounder to the talented Mitsunori Seki.  In 1962 Chionoi would drop a decision to future champion Hiroyuki Ebihara.  By this time Chionoi proved he going to be a force to be reckoned with in the near future.

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Best Punchers – The Heavyweights

*** FLASHBACK ~ This article originally appeared on dmboxing.com in June 2012

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By David Martinez / dmboxing.com

Here is my list of the 15 best punchers in the heavyweight division from the start of the Marquis of Queensberry era, (i.e.) 1892 to the present.  A formula that I am using to help illustrate this for each boxer is to show their percentage of knockouts which is calculated by the number of wins they had with the number of knockouts in those wins.  This formula isn’t intended to determine the order in which I have placed them; the order also includes my opinion of them as punchers.

I am not concerned about “who beat who”, how many times they were knocked out themselves or the results if they would have fought each other.  Their physical size or if they were a world champion has no bearing – this is strictly based on strength of punching power with the opponents they fought.  Why isn’t Muhammad Ali on this list?  Personally, I would take Ali to beat any of these punchers on my list – but mostly by decision wins and not by knockouts.  When I write rankings of boxers in any capacity I always get disagreements and feedback, so please know that I respect your opinions, and hope you will respect mine.

#1) Joe Louis (66 wins / 52 by KO = 78.7 %) Heavyweight champion 1940-1949. Defended title a record 25 times. He was a smooth, deadly puncher with tremendous power in either hand. His combinations had perfect accuracy with overwhelming power.

#2) George Foreman (76 wins / 69 by KO = 90.7 %) Two time heavyweight champion 1973-1974 and 1994-1997. He is recognized as one of the hardest hitters ever in boxing in any weight division. He is forth on my list in the percentage category of knockouts.

#3) Sonny Liston (50 wins / 39 by KO – 78.0 %) Heavyweight champion 1962-1964. The most intimidating heavyweight ever, his left jab alone was so powerful that it knocked opponents out – the jab – and his left hook was nothing less than devastating.

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A Dozen “Super Fight” Duds

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By Jim Amato / Senior Boxing Writer
Contributed to  dmboxing.com  since 2008

 

So many so called “Super Fights” have turned out to be “Super Duds” over the years.  True several have provided us with heart stopping thrills.  Still some have left us cold and unfulfilled as one party of the match didn’t quite live up to their end of the deal.

I have come up with twelve such contests that left me most unsatisfied at their conclusion. I’m sure other fans can think of many more that had a similar effect on them.

 

1) Salvador Sanchez – Wilfredo Gomez… Sanchez was a young, solid champion but Gomez was, Gomez. The man that had destroyed the invincible Carlos Zarate.  Well Salvador proved to the world and Gomez that he was an all-time great.  Wilfredo was down in the first and outclassed the rest of the way until it was stopped in round eight.

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